Review: Suee and the Shadow

Suee and the ShadowSuee and the Shadow by Ginger Ly

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Meet Suee. And her shadow. Suee’s shadow is not like other shadows. Suee’s shadow is alive. Follow Suee’s journey as she watches all her “friends” (she prefers not to have any friends) turn into zeroes.

What a cute graphic novel. Originally released in separate issues, this version is the complete issues. I felt like the shadow was the main character when the book was actually about Suee. I loved the way it was written, I can easily see different people viewing it differently.
The illustrations are excellent, they manage to create a sense of depression and foreboding without going too dark, they are still bright enough colour wise to actually be worth looking at.

Thanks to Netgalley and the publishers for this advanced reading copy

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Review: Ready Player One

Ready Player OneReady Player One by Ernest Cline

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I read this book off the back of a very high number of positive reviews from my fellow reading friends over at Book Club on Facebook.
I was really excited to start it, purely based on the number of people that rated it highly AND that a friend that doesn’t read very often had read it 3 times in a very short space of time.
I.Was.Not.Disappointed. And I don’t think you will be either.

Meet Wade, or Parzival as the majority of people know him. He lives and breathes the OASIS. The OASIS is a worldwide interactive virtual universe. People do everything within the OASIS.
As for the main story, Parzival and a million other OASIS users are in direct competition, solving challenges looking for an easter egg left by the games creator when he dies. That’s pretty much it. It may sound simple but the way that Cline managed to make the world work, whilst also pulling gaming and 80s references from left, right and centre is fantastic. A simple idea couldn’t be more complex in its appearance.

Based in America, a lot of the references to 80s gaming, music and films were Amercian BUT they weren’t that American that non-Americans (like me, a Brit) wouldn’t understand them. Some of the games weren’t released over here but I still had enough “gaming” knowledge to know exactly what was meant.

This was an absolutely fabulous read and one that I am glad I bought.

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Review: The Doll House

The Doll HouseThe Doll House by Phoebe Morgan

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Where do I start with my review of The Doll House by Phoebe Morgan? What a fantastic read. As Morgan’s debut novel I went in with low expectations. Recently I have had a spate of bad luck when it comes to decent crime thrillers so didn’t want to get too excited before I started. However, right from the off I was completely and utterly hooked.

(Taken from Amazon) You never know who’s watching… Corinne’s life might look perfect on the outside, but after three failed IVF attempts it’s her last chance to have a baby. And when she finds a tiny part of a doll house outside her flat, it feels as if it’s a sign. But as more pieces begin to turn up, Corinne realises that they are far too familiar. Someone knows about the miniature rocking horse and the little doll with its red velvet dress. Someone has been inside her house. How does the stranger know so much about her life? How long have they been watching? And what are they waiting for?

The author manages to pull her audience in from the beginning offering split times throughout the book and each chapter is told from the viewpoint of one of the characters involved. Although the description of the book focuses more on one person, I feel like this book definitely has multiple main characters, which in my opinion adds to the mystery.

I want to keep gushing about all the great things in this book but I don’t want to spoil it for everyone so I will stop there.

It can be purchased through Amazon UK on Kindle and is due for release on 14th September 2017: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Doll-House-g…

Thanks to Netgalley and the publishers for the advanced reading copy of this book

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August 2017 Reading Summary

 

This month I read 17 books. 16 shown above and also the (very) short story of The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.

I have rated and reviewed all of these books on my blog, although some reviews are not yet scheduled to be released due to the release dates of the books.

In the list above, I have ranked the books according to my favourites. This is not dependant on their ratings. Sometimes a book I rate 3 stars becomes a favourite or a book I rated 5 stars falls lower down the list.

Before I go on to talk about some of the books, here is the compiled lists of where these books came from:

7 from Netgalley
3 from the Library
1 from the Author as an Advanced Reading Copy
3 from iBooks
2 from Personal Collection

My favourite book of August was one from NetGalley, suggested to me by a friend over in book club, who is also a NetGalley member. Counting Wolves by Michael F Stewart is a book that combines mental health with fairytales. Set in a psychiatric ward, this story is so powerful I couldn’t put it down. Read my full review here.

The Doll House by Phoebe Morgan was the second crime thriller I have recently read. I used to read them all the time, but when I found YA/Fantasy I sort of drifted away. This book, coupled with Memory Man by David Baldacci, has reawakened a love for this genre and I can’t wait to read some more. My full review will be available to read on my blog from 14th September 2017 when the book is officially released. (Check out my review of Memory Man here).

Sons of Anarchy Volume 4 was my favourite graphic novel of the month. I recently (earlier this year) finished watching the TV show and was (as many others were) completely and utterly heartbroken when it ended. This was the perfect way to carry on with a bit of SoA action. Read my review here.

Anyway, that’s it for this month, hit that follow button to be updated when I post 🙂

 

 

 

Review: The Vampire’s Assistant – Darren Shan #2

The Vampire's Assistant (The Saga of Darren Shan, #2)The Vampire’s Assistant by Darren Shan

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Darren made the difficult decision to become a half-vampire to save his best mate Steve Leopard’s life. Now, he must leave his friends and family behind as he travels cross-country with the vampire Mr Crepsley and the Cirque du Freak. The Vampire’s Assistant is not for the squeamish or faint-hearted. How long can Darren go before he must drink human blood? How safe are Darren’s new-found friends? Why don’t the mysterious, blue-hooded dwarves speak or cry out in pain? And does their master Mr Des Tiny really feed on little children? No one is safe in this gruesome, macabre tale–more a who’s-going-to-do-what than a who-dunnit.

This is the second book in The Saga of Darren Shan (A Living Nightmare is the first, otherwise known as Cirque Du Freak). I bought the first nine books in this series from a car boot sale back in March of this year (2017), partly on a whim. I had never read anything by Shan before but had heard about this series. Even with little knowledge of the series, at £6.75 for nine books I couldn’t pass them up (I have a book buying problem haha). Anyway, when I loved the first book I decided my money was well spent and made a start on the second – The Vampire’s Assistant.

I’m really glad I decided to continue with the story because Shan does not disappoint. In the previous book, Darren Shan had agreed to become a half vampire and assistant to Crepsley (a fully fledged bonafide vampire) in order to save his best friends life. Moving into the current book, and we see Darren start his journey to a vampiric life. The pair flit around quite a bit at the beginning of the book but eventually end up back where it all started – at the Cirque Du Freak. Darren begins to make friends but things, unfortunately, aren’t plain sailing from there.

As with the first book, the writing and language used is quite simple. Not simple in a bad, OMG I can’t read this kind of way but in a way that shows that the author was clearly writing for the younger audience (not that I care that I am 33 and reading books clearly not aimed at me haha). The author spends some time building a scene but doesn’t go overboard with what I sometimes think are over the top descriptions e.g. He will describe a setting, but won’t linger too much on any particular thing – how bright and green the trees are, for example. He will say they are bright, and green but won’t stoop to using too many words. I think is perfect for the younger (and older) reader.

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